Alderman given glimpse of GRAMMY future
by Paisley Boston
Jul 02, 2014 | 1436 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
President of the Cleveland Music Foundation, Lucy Janoush, shows off pictures of the proposed Grammy Museum design and explains some of the fun features that the museum is set to have. "We will have a lighted dance floor and an instructor that will teach you dance moves. The museum will also feature a section that will allow you to write and record your own song," said Janoush.
President of the Cleveland Music Foundation, Lucy Janoush, shows off pictures of the proposed Grammy Museum design and explains some of the fun features that the museum is set to have. "We will have a lighted dance floor and an instructor that will teach you dance moves. The museum will also feature a section that will allow you to write and record your own song," said Janoush.
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"We have one time to do this and we must do it right," said Lucy Janoush, president of the Cleveland Music Foundation, during a Cleveland Board of Aldermen meeting Tuesday.

Janoush presented an update on the Grammy Museum to members of the board.

"When the museum opens, we will be the most technologically advance museum in the United States. There is still a good bit of dirt work that needs to be done before we start putting in the piping and then laying the foundation," said Janoush.

"The original project was going to be 20,000 square feet but with a few adjustments that we have made, it is now going to be 27,000 square feet. The project will be done in four phases and we are just about complete with phase two," she added.

Janoush also said the fundraising efforts for the museum had far exceeded their expectations.

"Our fundraising has been going extremely well. Our original goal was to raise $15 million and we are already over $15 million and our new goal is $18 million," she said.

During her presentation, Janoush displayed several pictures of the museum and many of its potential components.

"We will have an outdoor concert venue out front for anyone who may want to do a concert. We are almost complete with the exhibit design and 20 percent of our exhibit will be dedicated to Mississippi," said Janoush.

Cleveland Mayor Billy Nowell said he is grateful to have Janoush lead this project.

"She is the backbone of this entire project and she has been doing a wonderful job to really put Cleveland on the map," said Nowell.

After Janoush's presentation, Bob Eley, Bolivar County engineer, gave an update on the wastewater treatment plant task order.

"We are preparing plans for a new waste water treatment plant and we have been reviewing and studying various permits. We did a technical investigation on the design and primary electrical service. We also did a preliminary design for the plant," said Eley.

"We have been doing a thorough survey for the site of the plant and its boundaries, about 95 percent of this phase has been completed," he added.

Several members of the community appeared before the board to discuss zoning.

"When we looked at our map, we saw that there were some properties that should have been labeled differently according to their purpose such as commercial property or housing units," said board attorney Jamie Jacks."

Thomas Morris of Cleveland said he had a few discrepancies with the way in which the zoning map had labeled his property.

"I am concerned about the property surrounding my office on the corner of Cross and Chrisman Street. I own property on each one of those corners and I have used them for commercial purposes for over 40 years," said Morris.

"I would prefer to have my property remain labeled or zoned as commercial properties," he added.

After much debate, members of the board approved Morris's request.

Members of the community also went before the board to discuss nuisances that had been issued concerning various things such as grass cutting and debris.

"We have about 40 pages of nuisances for various things but they are all primarily related to grass cutting," said Jacks.

After zoning matters and grass cutting were discussed and resolved, Cleveland Police Chief Buster Bingham presented the police department's report and made a request to purchase five handguns.

"We have officers retiring and in the past, we have allowed our retiring officers to purchase their handguns for $1; therefore, we are going to need more handguns. I have found a company that will allow us to purchase five handguns for $1,400," said Bingham.

His request was approved.