Trick-or-Treat safely Thursday
Oct 30, 2013 | 2303 views | 0 0 comments | 28 28 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Different houses throughout Cleveland have gotten into the spirit of Halloween and decorated their homes with ghosts, pumpkins, and witches. Homemade or store bought, the decorations throughout Cleveland are both festive and spooky.
Different houses throughout Cleveland have gotten into the spirit of Halloween and decorated their homes with ghosts, pumpkins, and witches. Homemade or store bought, the decorations throughout Cleveland are both festive and spooky.
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One of the biggest days for candy is Thursday, as youngsters all over the county will celebrate Halloween.

All cities and towns in Bolivar County are encouraging parents to take their children Trick-or-Treating in the early evening.

Most communities do not have specified times for Halloween but a few do, including Boyle and Cleveland, 5-8 p.m.; Drew, Mound Bayou and Shelby 5-7 p.m.; Gunnison, 4-6 p.m.; and Ruleville, 6-9 p.m.

Winstonville will hold an event at 6 p.m. at the Winstonville Community Center.

Delta State University is to hold a Trunk or Treat at Statesmen Park beginning at 5 p.m., followed by a Community Cookout and Entertainment and Fireworks display.

As of presstime, Delta State officials still had not decided if they were going to cancel the event or change the location due to predicted thunderstorms for Thursday night.

The National Weather Service is predicting a 100 percent change of rainfall with possible thunderstorms.

The Bolivar Commercial will have updates on its website and Facebook page when an announcement is made.

Cleveland Police Chief Buster Bingham said that an adult should accompany young children while Trick or Treating, and participants should always travel in groups and carry a light for safety.

Bingham also asks that trick-or-treaters be 14 years old or younger.

AAA suggests motorists and trick-or-treaters reduce their risk of being involved in a crash by doing some advanced planning:

• Avoid traveling through residential areas. If possible, try to avoid cutting through residential areas where trick-or-treaters are likely to be present.

• Obey all traffic signs and signals. The risk of killing a pedestrian increases more than many people realize with just small increases in speed. A pedestrian is nearly twice as likely to be killed if they’re hit by a car going 30 mph compared to if they’re hit at 25 mph, according to the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.  What seems like a small difference—just 5 mph—can literally be the difference between life and death.

• Watch for children walking on roadways, medians and curbs. In dark costumes, they'll be harder to see at night. Also, be aware that trick-or-treaters may not be paying attention to traffic and may mid-block or between parked cars. Motorists should scan far ahead when driving in residential areas, watch for children and cautiously monitor their actions. Turn on your headlights to make yourself more visible - even in the daylight.

• Plan and discuss the route your trick-or-treaters will follow.

• Have children wear disguises that don't obstruct vision, and avoid facemasks. Instead, use nontoxic face paint.

• Parents and trick-or-treaters should cross streets only at the corner, and never between parked cars or mid-block.  Be sure that approaching cars come to a complete stop before stepping into the roadway.